Curriculum Offer and Entry Requirements 2021

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS 

  • 5 GCSEs (or BTEC equivalent) at grade level 9 – 4 including English Language and Mathematics.
  • GCSE English Language or Literature is required for almost all subjects at A Level/ Level 3 BTEC
  • GCSE Mathematics is required for many subjects – please check individual subject requirements
  • In addition you must have an ability to demonstrate a good attitude towards learning across KS4
  • We strongly advise that students look closely at the subject specific entry requirements

Subject Specific Entry Requirements

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR SIXTH FORM

Our Sixth Form students will be well-rounded intellectually, socially and emotionally. They will be equipped with the skills and knowledge for life, work and learning in order to be able to flourish within a decent society.​

This means:​

  • Ensuring academic challenge, support and a love of learning​
  • Creating structures and spaces that allow relationships to thrive​
  • Developing individuals who are empathetic and articulate, confident and resilient​
  • Cultivating the appreciation of human endeavour and achievement​

Art and Design

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR ART AND DESIGN

Charters School Art and Design students will be inspired by opportunities to make discoveries and adopt a ‘what if’ approach, using a broadening range of mediums and processes. Through research, experimentation, recording their environment and the world around them, they will be equipped to communicate through creative individual and personal outcomes; generating an increasing enjoyment and interest.

This means:

  • They will be able to confidently analyse, evaluate and articulate their understanding of artwork using an art-based vocabulary based on written work and discussion
  • They will appreciate the historical, contemporary, ethnic, political and cultural diversity of the art community, and through this appreciation, learn to understand the deeper meanings, codes and symbols embedded within it
  • They will record experiences and observations, in a variety of ways using drawing and other visual forms, such as photography
  • They will generate and explore potential lines of enquiry using appropriate media and techniques, and apply this knowledge and understanding to making, reviewing and modifying images and artefacts
  • They will learn to understand how ideas, opinion and experience generate starting points for art and design practice, forming an integral part of the creative process
  • The students will be able to present a personal and creative response that realises their intentions, making meaningful connections between their visual research, opinions and observations

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

The Art students follow the Pearson EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced GCE in Art and Design. The multi-disciplinary unendorsed course develops and enhances the students’ understanding of how ideas generate starting points and form an integral part of the creative process. They learn how images and artefacts relate to ethical and political contexts, and undertake development and refinement of ideas. They develop existing and new skills to express their ideas and interests, recording on-going critical review and analysis, responding to a theme or topic. Through a collection of investigations and experiments, they produce and present outcomes, usually supported by study visits to exhibitions and working with practitioners, where possible.
Study of this Advanced specification students will achieve the skills, knowledge and understanding to progress to foundation and degree-related study through further specialisation, development of themes, research, exploration and practical implementation.

This course provides opportunity to develop important transferable skills such as cognitive and creative skills, self-confidence, communication and self-management, problem solving and critical thinking.

CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

This course provides opportunity to develop important transferable skills such as cognitive and creative skills, self-confidence, communication and self-management, problem solving and critical thinking.

Component 1 – Personal Investigation. This comprises of 3 elements – supporting studies, practical work and a written personal study, which comprises 12% of the final mark. This is the coursework and represents 60% of the total qualification.
Component 2 – Externally Set Examination. The examination paper is issued at the beginning of the Spring term and comprises of 2 major elements supporting studies and practical work. The external assessment of 15 hours is the final examination and is normally completed over 3 days. It represents 40% of the final grade.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 5 in Art and GCSE grade level 4 in English Language or Literature.

To follow the A Level course, you must have proven practical skills and a genuine passion for researching, creating and making. The practical activities set during the Induction day for collection in September will provide this evidence. ALL external students must bring their portfolio to school at the beginning of the course in September.

EXAM BOARD: PEARSON EDEXCEL

Biology

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR BIOLOGY

We encourage Biology students at Charters School to develop an understanding and appreciation for the life surrounding them. We offer a supportive yet challenging environment with varied opportunities to explore the natural world through research, group experiments and enquiry-lead learning.

This means:

They are encouraged to hold their own point of view about scientific developments, articulate advantages and disadvantages, broadening their awareness through research, debate and discussion.
They will learn how science has developed over time, building on the understanding and research of others, and the importance of scientists working as a community.
Through scientific enquiry they will learn to question and use the laboratory resources and equipment to provide data to come to conclusions.
They will make connections between the scientific principles and theory they learn and the applications in everyday life.
They will be aware of how scientific theory links to the varied occupations that use science, and specific science careers.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM FOR BIOLOGY

OCR’s A Level in Biology A specification aims to encourage learners to:

  • develop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of the subject and how they relate to each other
  • develop and demonstrate a deep appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of scientific methods
  • develop competence and confidence in a variety of practical, mathematical and problem solving skills
  • develop their interest in and enthusiasm for the subject, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with the subject
  • understand how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society (as exemplified in ‘How Science Works’ (HSW).

BIOLOGY KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS


Content is split into six teaching modules:

Module 1: Development of Practical Skills in biology (‘Practical Activities’)
Module 2: Foundations in Biology
Module 3: Exchange and Transport
Module 4: Biodiversity, Evolution and Disease
Module 5: Communication, Homeostasis and Energy
Module 6: Genetics, Evolution and Ecosystems

Practical Activities are delivered throughout the course and lead to the Practical Endorsement if students demonstrate competency in the specified Common Practical Assessment Criteria (CPAC) used by all exam boards.

 

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS


GCSE Triple Science

GCSE grade level 6 in the subject and a GCSE grade level 6 in Mathematics and GCSE grade level 5 in English Language or Literature.

GCSE Double Science

Of the two grades allocated for your GCSE one must be at least GCSE grade level 7 and the other at least a GCSE grade level 6. You must also achieve a GCSE grade level 6 in Mathematics and a GCSE grade level 5 in English Language or Literature.

A GCSE grade level 6 in Mathematics is preferred for entry to this course however students who achieve a grade level 5 in Mathematics will be considered at the discretion of the Head of Department.

EXAM BOARD: OCR

Business

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR BUSINESS

Business students at Charters School will be enthusiastic and curious about the modern day management of business with the ongoing opportunities and threats faced in the dynamic market place. Students are required to be critical and reflective in their learning and to understand business behaviour from a range of perspectives, they must be willing and able to challenge the assumptions made through theory.

This means:

  • They will have a strong understanding of the internal management of an organisation along with an appreciation of external influences affecting decision-making.
  • They will be able to develop knowledge and skills needed to understand how to analyse data, think critically about issues and make informed decisions.
  • They will be confident in using both quantitative and qualitative skills and appreciate that, when evaluating using both can improve the robustness of a judgement.
  • They will be well read and independent in their learning.
  • Students will be able to articulate their thoughts, debate and discuss key issues facing the modern day business environment.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM FOR A LEVEL BUSINESS

A level Business Students follow the Edexcel syllabus. The curriculum is structured into four themes and consists of three externally examined papers.  Students are introduced to business in Themes 1 and 2 through building knowledge of core business concepts and applying them to business contexts to develop a broad understanding of how businesses work. Breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding, with applications to a wider range of contexts and more complex business information, are developed in Themes 3 and 4, requiring students to take a more strategic view of business opportunities and issues.  Students are encouraged to use an enquiring, critical and thoughtful approach to the study of business, to understand that business behaviour can be studied from a range of perspectives and to challenge assumptions

BUSINESS A LEVEL CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

Theme 1: In this theme, students are introduced to the market, explore the marketing and people functions and investigate entrepreneurs and business start up.
Theme 2: In this theme, students explore the finance and operations functions, and investigate external influences on business.

Theme 3: In this theme, students develop their understanding of the concepts introduced in Theme 2 and explore influences on business strategy and decision-making.

Theme 4: In this theme, students develop their understanding of the concepts introduced in Theme 1 and explore business activity in a global context.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 5 in English Language or Literature and Mathematics.

If you have a BTEC Level 2 Tech in Enterprise a minimum of a Merit is required.

EXAM BOARD: EDEXCEL

 

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM FOR BUSINESS BTEC

BTEC Business Students at KS5 follow the Edexcel syllabus. The curriculum is structured into three core units and one non-core units, therefore achieving an A Level equivalent grade.  The units give you an introduction to and understanding of the business environment, management of resources, marketing and communication and work experience – all fundamental to the success of business organisations. Units are broken down into individual assignments and/or tasks which are subsequently assessed by your teacher through controlled assessments or through external examinations. The BTEC quali?cation gives you the knowledge, understanding and skills that you need to prepare for employment or higher education.

CURRICULUM MAP FOR BTEC BUSINESS

COURSE DETAILS

Unit 1: Exploring Business:  In this unit, you will gain an overview of the key ingredients for business success, how businesses are organised, how they communicate, the characteristics of the environment in which they operate, and how this shapes them and their activities. You will also look at the importance of innovation and enterprise to the success and survival of businesses, with the associated risks and benefits.

Unit 2: Developing a Marketing Campaign:  Marketing is a dynamic field central to the success of any business. You will gain an understanding of how a marketing campaign is developed. You will explore different stages of the process that a business goes through when developing its campaign and develop your own campaign for a given product/service.

Unit 3: Personal and Business Finance:  This unit includes aspects of both personal and business finance. Personal finance involves the understanding of why money is important and how managing your money can help prevent future financial difficulties. It is vital you understand the financial decisions you will need to take throughout your life and how risk can affect you and your choices. This unit will also give you an insight into where you can get financial advice and support.

The business finance aspects of the unit introduce you to accounting terminology, the purpose and importance of business accounts and the different sources of finance available to businesses. Planning tools, such as cash flow forecasts and break-even, will be prepared and analysed. Measuring the financial performance of a business will require you to prepare and analyse statements of comprehensive income and statements of financial position.

Unit 27: Work Experience in Business:   In this practical unit, you will learn about different types of work-related learning and their benefits. You will learn what information you need before starting the placement, and how the placement can help you to develop key competencies needed for employability, such as self-management, team working, problem-solving and communication skills. You will learn more about the expectations of different roles. You will research and take on relevant work experience, and evaluate your performance through a reflective journal.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE Level 4 in English Language and GCSE Level 4 in Mathematics. Minimum of 5 GCSEs graded 4 or higher.

EXAM BOARD: EDEXCEL

 

 

Chemistry

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR CHEMISTRY

Chemistry students at Charters School will develop understanding and awareness of the science that surrounds them and how chemical reactions are an integral aspect of their daily lives.  They will develop technical expertise with a range of equipment, and knowledge of how science and technology changes society, from forensics to formulations and combustion to climate change.  Transferable skills, such as the scientific methods and data analysis, will prepare them with the knowledge needed for their future as an informed citizen, alongside providing strong foundations for a specialised scientific career

This means:

They will learn how theories of the atom developed over time, building on the understanding and research of others, and the importance of scientists working as a community in the pursuit of new knowledge. We will emulate this approach in the classroom.
Students will be aware of how scientific theory links to the varied occupations that use chemistry and to chemistry-specific careers.
Through scientific enquiry they will learn to ask scientific questions and use the extensive practical facilities at Charters to collect data to come to valid conclusions themselves.
They will hold their own point of view about scientific developments and articulate advantages and disadvantages, broadening their awareness through research, debate and discussion.
They will make connections between the scientific principles and theory they learn and the applications of chemistry to everyday life.


SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM


OCR’s A Level in Chemistry A specification aims to support students to:

  • develop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of the subject and how they relate to each other
  • develop competence and confidence in a variety of practical, mathematical and problem solving skills through the required Practical Activities
  • develop their interest in and enthusiasm for the subject, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with the subject through trips to University Chemistry departments, participation in competitions, visits to Industry and work placements
  • 4. understand how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society by linking teaching to everyday life.

CHEMISTRY KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

Content is split into six teaching modules:

Module 1 – Development of practical skills in chemistry
Module 2 – Foundations in chemistry
Module 3 – Periodic table and energy
Module 4 – Core organic chemistry
Module 5 – Physical chemistry and transition elements
Module 6 – Organic chemistry and analysis

The Practical Activities are delivered throughout the course and lead to the Practical Endorsement if students demonstrate competency in the specified Common Practical Assessment Criteria (CPAC) used by all exam boards.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS 

For students who studied GCSE Triple Science:

GCSE grade level 6 in the subject and a GCSE grade level 6 in Mathematics.

For students who studied GCSE Combined Science:

Of the two grades allocated for your GCSE one must be at least GCSE grade level 7 and the other at least GCSE grade level 6. If a student achieved a 6-6 but has the breakdown of marks and can show a higher grade in the chemistry papers then they will also be considered.

A grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics is preferred for entry to this course; students who achieve a grade 5 will be considered at the discretion of the Head of Department.

EXAM BOARD: OCR

Computer Science

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE

Students of Computing will become digitally literate, able to develop their ideas and express themselves through information and communication technology. They will learn how to use programming languages to design algorithms which solve computational problems. Students opting to study ICT at KS4, will also acquire practical skills to become confident users of creative media and an understanding of how wider digital media plays an important role in their everyday lives.

This means:

  • They will develop the skills to use a range of software for a variety of purposes including office applications, web authoring and graphics editing.
  • They will be able to analyse a task, identify the requirements, design and implement a solution.
  • They will be able to design algorithms to solve problems and code solutions using two or more high-level programming languages.
  • They will be able to critically reflect on their work, evaluate the extent to which it meets the requirements and identify future improvements.
  • They will develop their understanding of the legal, social, economic, ethical and environmental issues raised by ICT and Computer Science.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM 

A-level Computer Science is “an intensely creative subject that combines invention and excitement, and can look at the natural world through a digital prism” (OCR, specification, 2016). The qualification builds upon the GCSE enabling students to gain a deeper understanding and further ability to apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms and data representation. Students will develop their ability to analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including writing programs. Another aim of the qualification is for students to be able to think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically. They will be able to articulate the moral, ethical, legal and cultural opportunities and risks of digital technology. Students will develop the capacity to see relationships between different aspects of computer science and develop the mathematical skills used to express computational laws and processes e.g. Boolean algebra.

CURRICULUM SUMMARY FOR KEY STAGE 5 COMPUTER SCIENCE

COURSE DETAILS

Component 1: Computer systems (Y12) – This component introduces students to the internal workings of the Central Processing Unit (CPU), the exchange of data and will also look at software development, data types and legal and ethical issues.

Component 2: Algorithms and programming (Y12 and Y13) – In this component students will learn what is meant by computational thinking, the benefits of applying it and the principles of solving problems by computational methods. Students will learn to use algorithms to describe problems, and to analyse problems by identifying the component parts.

Component 3: Programming project (Y13) – This component is a non-examined assessment in which students are expected to analyse, design, develop, test, evaluate and document a program written in a suitable programming language. Students are expected to apply appropriate principles from an agile development approach to the project development.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE

GCSE grade 6+ in Computer Science, GCSE grade 5+ in Mathematics and GCSE grade 5+ in English Language or Literature.

EXAM BOARD: OCR

Drama and Theatre Studies

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR DRAMA AND THEATRE STUDIES

Drama and Theatre students at Charters School will explore their creativity through a variety of styles, themes and topics. Students will become confident and independent thinkers, who are able to critically analyse the roles within theatre and live productions. Students will have an appreciation of their own work and others, always demonstrating respect and empathy. They will participate in an engaging, practical curriculum, that supports the development of new acting skills, as well nurturing existing talent.

This means:

  • They will study a range of practitioners, plays and styles of theatre, in order to develop their practical and theoretical understanding of Drama.
  • Through verbal and written evaluations, they will confidently articulate and analyse live productions and their own performances. Within this, they will identify drama techniques and skills and form a critical opinion.
  • They will regularly make, perform and respond to Drama, in order to develop their own practice, through the delivery of a broad and exciting curriculum.
  • They will develop core transferable skills, such as communication, co-operation and confidence that will assist them in any chosen career path

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM


A-level Drama and Theatre Students follow the Eduqas syllabus. The A-level requires that, over the two years, students will create, develop and perform in three formally assessed performance pieces, as either an actor or designer. One performance focuses on the re-interpretation of a text. Students learn about the styles and approaches of different practitioners and theatre companies and explore how they can use these in their own performance work. This is also applied to a devised piece of theatre, applying influential skills and techniques of a different practitioner or company, in response to a stimulus. Finally, students perform a piece of text with a contrasting style to their previous pieces. Written documentation of the process and evaluation of these performances is also crucial. Therefore, students develop analytical skills and an in-depth theoretical understanding of how performance elements are applied to create meaning. This is supported through numerous visits to see live theatre. They are also required to demonstrate, in a written exam, their knowledge of how texts might be brought to life by actors, directors and designers.

CURRICULUM MAP FOR KEY STAGE 5 DRAMA AND THEATRE STUDIES

COURSE DETAILS

Component 1: Theatre Workshop (YR 12) – This component requires students to demonstrate skills and understanding in a text-based performance; either as actors or designers.

Component 2: Text in Action (YR 13) – This component requires students to demonstrate skills and understanding of text based and devised performance, as well as the ideas and influences of particular theatre practitioners, companies and styles.

Component 3: Text in Performance (YR 12 and 13) – This component is a written exam. Students will study three set texts: Hedda Gabler, Saved and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time from the perspectives of directors, actors and designers.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 5 in Drama or Merit in BTEC Performing Arts.

GCSE grade level 4 in English Language or Literature.

Your attitude to learning must be very good.


SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM FOR BTEC PERFORMING ARTS

BTEC Performing Arts students follow the Pearson BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in Performing Arts (Acting) syllabus. The BTEC qualification requires that, over the two years, students will create, develop and perform in six formally assessed performance pieces, as actors and producers. These range from the two core units, Principles of Acting and Performing to an Audience, to other possible units, including Variety Performance, Applying Physical Theatre and Auditions for Actors. Methods of assessments in this BTEC qualification include rehearsal observations, logbooks, viva voce and filmed performances.
The course’s main purpose is to allow learners to develop the core specialist knowledge, understanding and skills required by the Performing Arts sector, such as interpreting and devising performance material and performing skills.

DRAMA KEY BTEC YEAR 12 CURRICULUM MAP

DRAMA KEY STAGE YEAR 13 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

Core Units
Unit 19: Principles of Acting (YR12)
In this unit, learners will study the key principles of acting. These are explored mainly through practical workshops, tutor-led rehearsals and performances to a live audience.

Unit 7: Performing to an Audience (YR13)
The aim of this unit is to give learners experience of performing a role as part of an ensemble presenting rehearsed work to a live audience in an appropriate vocational setting.

Optional Units
Unit 15: Variety Performance
The aim of this unit is to enable learners to develop and perform an ‘act’ or ‘turn’ as part of a Variety Show. Learners will devise their own material, rehearse it and perform it.

Unit 21: Improvisation
This unit invites learners to work on dramatic situations without the initial support of a written text. It allows the free exploration of ideas that can be developed into dramatic form to performance level.

Unit 33: Applying Physical Theatre
Learners will explore and develop physical theatre forms and techniques, applying them in a performance to an audience.

Unit 18: Auditions for Actors
This unit equips learners with the planning skills and key acting techniques to deliver effective audition performances for employment in live theatre and filmed media

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS


BTEC Level 2 Merit grade (if studied) and GCSE Grade 5 in English Language or English Literature.

EXAM BOARD: EDUQAS

Design Technology

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

Design Technology students at Charters School will be using an iterative design approach to widen their understanding of a variety of materials and manufacturing processes through a series of design and make projects. They will develop an awareness of the current social and environmental impacts that Design Technology has during the entire product lifecycle.

This means:

They will learn about types, sources and properties of a variety of materials.
Via application, they will learn a range of processes used to manufacture products as scale models or working prototypes.
They will apply investigation strategies to inform the development of their designs.
Innovative design strategies will be adopted to ensure their product is fit for purpose.
They will develop analytical and evaluative skills and be confident enough to self-reflect, which leads to further exploration of ideas.
They will understand how to identify and fulfil client needs to ensure a successful and marketable product.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

The Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Design and Technology (Product Design)enables the following.

Equipping students with design skills for the future Students will be able to recognise design needs and develop an understanding of how current global issues, including integrating technology, impacts on today’s world.

Encourages creativity and innovation – At A level students will have the confidence to innovate and produce creative design solutions as they develop their own design brief with a client user.

Clear routes through the specification – We’ve listened to your feedback and our specification aims to demystify the new rules around the new qualification requirements to make sure you know precisely what you have to teach.

Progression from GCSE and beyond to HE/Careers We’ve designed the GCSE and AS/A level qualifications together to ensure clear progression of knowledge, understanding and design/making skills so that students will have a coherent experience of moving from the breadth of the GCSE to the specialisation depth of A level and beyond.

CURRICULUM MAP FOR KEY STAGE 5 DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

COURSE DETAILS

Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Design Technology (Product Design) (9DT0)
Students work will be assessed in 2 component parts.

Component 1: Principles of Design and Technology written examination which is 2 hours 30 minutes in length accounts for 50% of the qualification.

Component 2: Independent Design and Make Project (NEA) The portfolio will contain approximately 40 sides of A3 paper (or electronic equivalent).

There are four parts to the assessment:

Part 1: Identifying and outlining possibilities for design
Identification and investigation of a design possibility, investigation of client/end user needs, wants and values, research and production of a specification

Part 2: Designing a prototype
Design ideas, development of design idea, final design solution, review of development and final design and communication of design ideas

Part 3: Making a final prototype
Design, manufacture and realisation of a final prototype, including tools and equipment and quality and accuracy

Part 4: Evaluating own design and prototype
Testing and evaluation

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade 5 in Design Technology (any of Textiles, Resistant Materials or Graphic Products)
You will need to have at least a GCSE grade 4 in Mathematics and Science (15% of the A Level involves Mathematics).

EXAM BOARD: PEARSON EDEXCEL

Economics

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR ECONOMICS

Economics students at Charters Schools will develop an enthusiasm for the subject, appreciating the contribution of economics to the understanding of the wider economic and social environment. They will use an enquiring, critical and thoughtful approach to the study of economics and develop an ability to think as an economist. Students will develop qualities and attitudes which will equip them for the challenges, opportunities and responsibilities of adult and working life.

This means:

  • They understand and apply economic theory to support analysis of current economic problems and issues.
  • They analyse data critically that enables informed decisions to be made.
  • They explore current economic controversies and disagreements that exist between economists, appreciating the reasons for this.
  • They develop a critical approach to economic models and methods of enquiry.
  • They debate current local, national and global economic issues.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

EXAM BOARD: AQA
Key Stage 5
Summary of Curriculum
A Level Economics students follow the AQA specification. The curriculum features two main units which cover micro and macroeconomics. In terms of assessment, there are three externally examined papers; Paper 1 covers microeconomics Paper 2 covers macroeconomics. Paper 3 is an amalgamation of the two main units. The approach taken by the subject is for students to apply economic theory to support analysis of current economic problems and issues, and encourage students to appreciate the interrelationships between micro and macroeconomics. Students develop the knowledge and skills needed to understand and analyse data, think critically about issues and make informed decisions. They will build upon their quantitative skills and appreciate that, when evaluating arguments, both qualitative and quantitative evidence are important. Question papers use a variety of assessment styles including real-life case studies and data exercises to prepare students for further study and employment.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

Unit 1: Students are introduced to economic methodology and the economic problem, individual decision making, price determination in a competitive market, production, market structures, the labour market, the distribution of income and wealth, the market mechanism and government intervention in markets.

Unit 2: Students are introduced to macroeconomic performance, circular flow of income and aggregate demand and supply, economic growth, unemployment, inflation, financial markets and the international economy.

Unit 3: This unit is an amalgamation of Units 1 and 2 and students are required to analyse the relationships between micro and macroeconomics.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 5 in English Language or Literature and in Mathematics.

EXAM BOARD: AQA

English

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR ENGLISH

English students at Charters school will be prepared for and capable of communicating effectively in the modern world in order to achieve success. Through the study of language, students will develop an appreciation for the writer’s craft and the skills required to express oneself clearly. An advanced vocabulary and a broad range of reading skills will further students’ abilities to communicate in a mature, coherent manner whilst appreciating alternative viewpoints and perspectives. The study of literature will further develop students’ analytical skills and also encourage them to appreciate the aesthetic and entertaining qualities of high calibre literary texts.

This means:

  • They will be able to communicate effectively and confidently in both written and spoken tasks.
  • They will enjoy an environment and culture where reading is encouraged and positively supported.
  • They will appreciate a broad range of literature across genre, gender, time and culture.
  • They will have a strong grasp of how to use a range of vocabulary to craft academic writing, with technical accuracy.
  • They will develop an analytical approach to texts, allowing them to appreciate layers of meanings and themes.
     

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM - ENGLISH LITERATURE


The aims of this course are to encourage learners to develop their interest in and enjoyment of literature and literary studies as they read widely and independently both set texts and others that they have selected for themselves. They will engage critically and creatively with a substantial body of texts and ways of responding to them. They will also develop and effectively apply their knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation in writing. Finally, they will explore the contexts of the texts they are reading and others’ interpretations of them.

ENGLISH LITERATURE KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

Component 1: Drama and poetry pre-1900 This component requires learners to
study and respond to three texts. Learners are expected to demonstrate their appreciation of the significance of cultural and contextual influences on the writers, readers and/or audiences and be able to explore relationships between their chosen texts. This section requires learners to read texts in a variety of ways and respond critically and creatively. The texts currently studied are Shakespeare’s ‘The Tempest,’ poetry by Rossetti and ‘A Doll’s House’ by Ibsen.

Component 2: Comparative and contextual study This component requires learners to study two dystopian texts, currently ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ by Margaret Atwood and ‘1984’ by George Orwell. Learners are also required to read widely and independently in their chosen topic of study.

Component3: Literature post-1900 The aim of this internally assessed component is to encourage individual study, interest and enjoyment of modern literature and for learners to develop an appreciation of how writers shape meanings in texts through use of language, imagery, form and structure. They will develop an understanding of texts informed by an appreciation of different interpretations. They will further develop an ability to explore connections across texts, such as stylistic, thematic or contextual.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE Grade 6 in English Language and Grade 6 in English Literature.

 

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM - ENGLISH LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE


The OCR A Level in English Language and Literature (EMC) is designed to offer learners a broad range of texts to engage with, including the study of non-fiction spoken and written texts, novels, poetry and plays, as well as providing opportunities for original writing. Text choices offer a fresh and stimulating approach to learning, enabling learners to develop the analytical tools to explore language choices in detail and to become confident and insightful readers. A level learners will develop their skills as producers and interpreters of language through independent study and wider reading in an area of particular personal interest, offering excellent preparation for study at undergraduate level.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP FOR KEY STAGE 5 ENGLISH LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE

COURSE DETAILS

Component 1: Exploring non-fiction and spoken texts – This component requires learners to focus on an anthology of 20 non-fiction spoken and written texts across different time periods and contexts. They will then engage in comparative and contextual study based on the anthology and unseen texts.

Component 2: The language of poetry and plays – This component requires learners to focus on one poetry collection from a choice of six (currently ‘Rapture’ by Carol Ann Duffy) and one drama text from a choice of six (currently ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ by Tennessee Williams. They will then engage in exploration of the texts through stylistic and dramatic analysis.

Component 3: Reading as a writer, writing as a reader – This component requires learners to
focus on exploring the nature of narrative in one prose fiction text from a choice of six (currently ‘The Great Gatsby’ by F Scott Fitzgerald)
Writing as a reader develops the understanding of narrative technique through a creative writing task (500 words) and a commentary (250 words).

Component 4: Independent study: analysing and producing texts – This component requires learners to pursue particular interests and develop their expertise through an analytical comparative essay on a set text from a list of 12 non-fiction texts and a second free choice text. One text must be post-2000. Learners also produce a piece of original non-fiction writing

 

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE Grade 6 in English Language and Grade 5 in English Literature

EXAM BOARD: OCR

Film Studies

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR FILM STUDIES

Film Studies students at Charters school will be able to analyse and appreciate the craft involved in story telling through the visual medium. They will be able to decode implicit and explicit messages, engaging critically with a wide range of films across the major genres, developing and sustaining personal responses through close textual analysis.  They will also be encouraged to appreciate the aesthetic artistry involved in the production of films so that that they can create their own, emulating specific styles and applying, or challenging conventions of a genre, evident in their own decision-making. They will be encouraged to explore film theory, research industrial context and work with media professionals to gain experience and insight concerning a career in the film industry.

This means:

  • They will watch a variety of films from different cultural perspectives, including those from the 1930’s to present day.
  • They will develop an analytical approach to texts, decoding media language.
  • They will apply film theory and use specialist terminology in their own explanations.
  • They will research and examine industrial context to fully understand the influence on production of films
  • They will appreciate the artistry in the construction of films and develop their own production skills.
  • They will take advantage of opportunities to work with media professionals.


SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

The WJEC Eduqas A Level in Film Studies is designed to introduce A level learners to a wide variety of films in order to broaden their knowledge and understanding of film and the range of responses films can generate. It offers opportunities to study mainstream American films from the past and the present as well as a range of recent and contemporary British films, American independent films and global films, both non-English language and English language. The historical range of film represented in those films is extended by the study of silent film and significant film movements so that learners can gain a sense of the development of film from its early years to its still emerging digital future. Studies in documentary, experimental and short films also add to the breadth of the learning experience. Production work is a crucial part of this A’ Level and is integral to learners’ study of film. Studying a diverse range of films from several different contexts is designed to give students the opportunity to apply their knowledge and understanding of how films are constructed in their own filmmaking and screenwriting.

KEY STAGE 5 FILM STUDIES CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

Component 1: This component requires students to undertake comparative studies of films from the Hollywood era 1930 and 1990, studying Hollywood Classics with ‘new Hollywood’ films as well as undertaking a two film study of American films from 2005 and a two film study of British films from 1995. Students are required to examine institutional and society
context and the influence of different directors on filmmaking. Students will explore the relationship between contexts and films through considering key elements of film (cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing, sound and performance), the structural elements of film (narrative construction and, where relevant, genre), aesthetic and representation issues.

Component 2: This component requires students to undertake global film-making perspectives and they are required to study two films, one from each of the following categories: • European film • Outside Europe as well as well as single film studies: a Documentary film, and concerning Film Movements: a Silent film and an Experimental Film (from 1960-200). They will examine core study areas, critical debates, filmmaking theories and aesthetic features, considering narrative and auteur.

Component 3: This component requires students to apply their understanding of filmmaking techniques and film narrative in their own coursework. They will produce a short film following the brief set by the examination board. The production may take the form of either a short film or a screenplay for a short film. The screenplay must be accompanied by a digitally photographed storyboard of a key sequence from the screenplay in order to demonstrate how the screenplay will be realised. Students must also complete an evaluative analysis of their production of between 1600 and 1800 words and make reference to all short films selected for study from the compilation set by WJEC (at least three short films totalling a minimum of 80 minutes).

CURRICULUM MAP FOR FILM STUDIES

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE Grade 4 in English Language or Grade 4 in English Literature

EXAM BOARD: WJEC EDUQAS

French

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR FRENCH

Language students at Charters School will be equipped with the skills necessary to interact in everyday situations in French and Spanish-speaking countries. They will be confident communicators, capable of articulating ideas, desires and needs in various contexts. They will appreciate the value of language-learning and understand more about the cultures of the languages studied. This understanding will help them develop a greater sense of their own identity and appreciate the values and diversity of local and global communities. Through language-learning, they will develop a range of soft skills, including independence, resilience, research and teamwork.

This means:

  • They will recognise that language-learning is a cumulative process which takes consistent effort and intellectual stamina
  • They will experience foreign cultures through exposure to the arts, entertainment, food and current affairs
  • They will have the opportunity to visit France and Spain with Charters
  • They will learn and use vocabulary and grammar effectively and independently, to communicate successfully
  • They will participate fully in pair and group work to support and learn from others.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

Summary of Curriculum
A level French is a vibrant course that combines well with many other subjects, leading to a wide range of opportunities at university and in the world of work.

Students learn to communicate at a high level in French, through the study of topical issues and cultural matters.

Authentic materials are drawn from many sources, including the French media.

A significant amount of grammar is taught in the first term to bridge the gap between GCSE and A level.

Students take responsibility for their own learning and developing skills to a high level.

Speaking skills are developed through one-to-one/two sessions with the French FLA.

Students also have the opportunity for a week’s work experience in France during the Y12 work experience week.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP FOR FRENCH

COURSE DETAILS

Paper 1: Listening, reading and translation.  Paper 1 is based on four themes: the evolution of French society; political and artistic culture of the French-speaking world; immigration and multicultural society in France; France under occupation in World War II.

Paper 2: written response to works and translation.
Students study a literary text (No et Moi) and a film (Intouchables).

Paper 3: Speaking
Paper 3 is based on four themes: the evolution of French society; political and artistic culture of the French-speaking world; immigration and multicultural society in France; France under occupation in World War II. There is also an independent research project.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 6 in French and GCSE grade level 4 in English Language or Literature. A grammar assessment takes place in September.

EXAM BOARD: EDEXCEL

Geography

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR GEOGRAPHY

Geography students at Charters School will be motivated and well-rounded decision makers who show an appreciation of the interconnectedness of the diverse physical and human world. Students will explore contemporary issues at a local, national and global scale to gain an insight into alternative viewpoints that enables them to make informed judgements and evidenced conclusions. Through fieldwork, students will develop enquiring minds and gain geographical skills and help them understand their place in creating a sustainable future.

This means:

  • Extending locational knowledge and deepening spatial awareness of the world’s regions to include the diverse continent of Africa, Antarctica, India, China and the UK.
  • Understanding geographical similarities, differences and the interconnectedness between places through the study of human and physical geography.
  • Developing empathetic skills by looking at a range of viewpoints at a variety of scales.
  • Using key words confidently to ‘speak like a Geographer’, justifying opinions in extended writing.
  • Using fieldwork, research and data handling skills to collect, analyse, draw conclusions and evaluations from geographical data using multiple sources.
  • Through a range of decision-making exercises, students will consider the future challenges and possible sustainable approaches.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

A-Level Geography students follow the Edexcel specification. The Geography A-Level covers a wide range of physical and human geographies, which results in students becoming well –rounded Geographers. Students are able to study relevant case studies, which link to current world events. They are examined on their knowledge in both aspects of the course (physical and human) as well as their ability to analyse data and figures and use the knowledge they have acquired to create synoptic links. Students will also have the opportunity to conduct a Geographical investigation, building enquiry questions and conducting fieldwork which will further develop skills in data analysis, drawing conclusions and being able to critically evaluate their work. A-Level Geography is seen as a facilitating subject to universities because of the skills that students develop.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP 

COURSE DETAILS

Paper 1 (Physical): Tectonic processes and hazards, Coastal Landscapes and Change, The Water Cycle and Water insecurity and The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security.

Paper 2 (Human): Globalisation, Regenerating Places, Superpowers and Migration, Identity and Sovereignty.

Paper 3 (Synoptic): This paper is a synoptic investigation which is based on a geographical issue within a pace-based context that links to the synoptic themes of players, attitudes and actions and futures and uncertainties rooted in two or more of the compulsory content areas.

Non-Examined assessment: Students will create and undertake a Geographical enquiry which will involve the collection of fieldwork and the presentation, analysis and evaluation of results.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 6 in Geography
GCSE grade level 5 in English Language or Literature.
GCSE grade level 4 in Mathematics – due to the statistical element.
The Subject Leader may decide to accept students who have a grade level 5 in Geography depending on their proximity to the grade boundary.

You must have studied Geography at GCSE to be accepted onto this course.

EXAM BOARD: PEARSON EDEXCEL B SPECIFICATION

History

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR HISTORY

History students at Charters School will be curious and inspired by the dilemmas, choices and beliefs of people in the past. Through the study of local, national and international events they will develop a greater sense of their own identity and through this appreciate the values and diversity of the wider community in which they form a part. They will answer questions of the present by engaging with the past and in doing so develop skills that will enable them to play a full part in a democratic society.

This means:

  • They will have a strong chronological understanding of Britain’s past and how its relationship with Europe and the wider world has developed.
  • They will be able to identify, analyse and evaluate different interpretations of the past and reach a balanced and reasoned judgement.
  • They will be able to confidently articulate their understanding of the past both in academic writing as well as through debate and discussion.
  • They will appreciate the ethnic and cultural diversity of our community and thereby become inclusive members of our society.
  • They will develop a critical and enquiring mind, which appreciates the impact of individual endeavour and shows empathy with the past.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

History is a popular subject at A-level with students following the AQA syllabus. The A Level requires students to develop their skills of analysis and evaluation through an appreciation of three distinct periods and countries covering a span of over 200 years. The breadth study in

Paper 1 is focused on Tsarist and Communist Russia between 1855-1917 and requires students to develop a secure understanding of the process of change over time. Through the content covered students will gain a richness in their understanding of Russia during this time, but also consider the key themes that drive change and continuity.

The depth study in Paper 2 concentrates on the Making of Modern Britain between 1951 and 2007 and allows students to demonstrate greater depth of understanding and historical knowledge over a shorter time frame. Like Paper 1 it will consider aspects of change over time, but consider in more details the inter-relationship between events.

The NEA represents the final component of the A-level and is focused on the topic of German unification and the challenge of Nationalism between 1789-1890. Whilst drawing on the breadth and depth of knowledge, as well as the analytical and evaluative skills of the examined components, the NEA builds on this by developing student’s ability to communicate a more considered response to an enquiry question, building upon research and communication skills in the process.

This course is essential for those wishing to pursue History in Higher Education, but also develops a range of transferable skills valued by universities and employers such as analysis, essay writing, evaluation, critical thinking, communication, historical awareness, and self-confidence.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP FOR HISTORY

COURSE DETAILS

AQA History 7042/HS – 80% Examined and 20% Non-Examined Assessment

Component 1 – Tsarist and Communist Russia 1855-1964 – 40% of A-Level
• 2.5 hour assessment based on three essay questions from a choice of four

Component 2 – The Making of Modern Britain, 1951-2007 – 40% of A-level
• 2.5 hour assessment based on three essay questions from a choice of four

Component 3 – NEA German Unification and the Challenge of Nationalism – 20% of A-Level
• 3000 word essay in response to an identified enquiry question.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 6 in History with GCSE grade level 5 in one of the English GCSEs.
The Head of Department may decide to accept students who have a grade level 5 in History depending on their proximity to the grade boundary.

Please note that a GCSE in History is mandatory.

EXAM BOARD: AQA

Mathematics

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR MATHEMATICS

Mathematics students at Charters School will be equipped to deal with the mathematics they will encounter in everyday life. Students will be encouraged to be independent learners, and to develop the confidence and resilience to try different approaches in order to reach a solution. They will be analytical, logical and able to think critically, while developing the mathematical literacy needed to interpret problems and present their ideas coherently.

This means our students will be able to:

  • Explain the reasoning behind mathematical processes, and incorporate problems which require students to demonstrate their understanding of the topic as well as their ability to apply the method
  • Present challenges during lessons which require resilience and analytical thinking
  • Model appropriate mathematical vocabulary and encourage mathematical literacy so students can correctly express their understandings
  • Provide opportunities to work independently both during and out of lessons
  • Interlink topics within the Mathematics curriculum and emphasise the mathematical links to different subject areas to ensure effective reinforcement of skills learnt.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

The course provides opportunities to develop skills in working with mathematical information, as well thinking logically and independently. There are three overarching themes which are inherent throughout the course. These include mathematical argument and proof; mathematical problem solving and mathematical modelling. Students are required to develop skills in these areas, working scientifically throughout both the pure and applied areas of the course.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP FOR MATHEMATICS

COURSE DETAILS

The course is assessed by three papers at the end of Year 13. Papers 1 and 2 are Pure Mathematics and paper 3 is Applied Mathematics (Statistics and Mechanics). Each paper is 2 hours and has 100 marks available. All papers are evenly weighted. Calculators are a requirement for all papers.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 7 in Mathematics is required.

Students who have completed the GCSE early should have studied some form of mathematics for the rest of the year such as Additional Mathematics (FMSQ) or done other A level booster work.
Summer induction homework must be completed and handed in. Anyone who was not at induction will be given the homework at the start of the course.

A basic skills test will be sat in the initial week. Failure to meet the department pass mark will result in the student being placed on a course of intervention. The test is based on the induction booklet and includes skills that are essential to the A level course.

Students with a grade 6 will be considered on a case by case basis. Any student accepted with a grade level 6 will be required to pass the basic skills test in order to study this course

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM FOR FURTHER MATHEMATICS

Further Mathematics provides the opportunity for students to extend and deepen their knowledge and understanding further, building beyond the standard A level course. Students will use their mathematical knowledge to make logical and reasoned decisions in solving problems both within pure mathematics and in a variety of contexts. Students will also be required to clearly communicate the mathematical rationale for their decisions. This course is studied in addition to the A level mathematics course.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP FOR FURTHER MATHEMATICS

COURSE DETAILS

The course is assessed by four papers at the end of Year 13. All papers are 75 marks in total, 90 minutes long and count for 25% of the final grade. Papers 1 and 2 are Core Pure Mathematics, paper 3 is Further Pure 1 and paper 4 is Further Statistics 1. Calculators are a requirement for all papers.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 8 in Mathematics required.

Students must have completed and handed in the induction homework. Anyone who was not at induction will be given the homework at the start of the course. Acceptance onto the A level Further Mathematics course is dependent on passing the competency test at the beginning of the year. This is based on the work in the induction booklet and includes skills that are essential to this A level.

Students selecting this course will study A Level Mathematics and Further Mathematics together over two years and will end up with an A level in both Mathematics and Further Mathematics (You do not need to select A level Mathematics as a separate option). There is a provision for students to sit the AS Further Mathematics exams should they wish to discontinue with the A Level Further Mathematics course at the end of year 12.

EXAM BOARD: EDEXCEL

Media Studies

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR MEDIA STUDIES

Media Studies students at Charters school will be able to analyse and appreciate the craft involved in communicating media messages in a global arena. They will be able to decode implicit and explicit messages across a range of media, recognising bias and demonstrate understanding concerning how representations are constructed for a specific purpose and audience. They will analyse media language which will inform their own design, filming and editing choices ensuring their cross-media productions target specific audiences. They will be encouraged to explore and apply media theory, research industrial context and work with media professionals to gain experience and insight concerning a media career.

This means:

  • They will develop an analytical approach to texts, decoding media language.
  • They will apply media theory and use media terminology in their own explanations.
  • They will research and examine industrial context to fully understand the influence on production of media texts.
  • They will produce their own cross-media productions targeting a specific audience.
  • They will take advantage of opportunities to work with media professionals.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

The WJEC Eduqas Media Studies A Level is designed to introduce students to a range of media forms in terms of a specific theoretical framework which consists of: media language, representation, media industries and audiences. Students will have the opportunity to study a range of media texts in depth, analysing how media texts communicate meaning and how they relate to wider historical contexts. They will examine and apply theoretical approaches and theories to support critical exploration and reflection, analysis and debate. For the full framework, they will study: newspapers, magazines, television, online, social and participatory media. Advertising and marketing, film, music video, radio and video games will be studied in relation to selected areas of the framework.

Production work is a crucial part of this A’ Level and is integral to learners’ study of media. Students will have the opportunity to apply their understanding in their own cross-media production.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP FOR FILM STUDIES

COURSE DETAILS

Component 1: In this component, students will develop knowledge and understanding of key aspects of the theoretical framework – media language and representation assessing media language and representation in relation to two of the following media forms: advertising, marketing, music video or newspapers. They will also develop understanding of Media Industries and Audiences and assessment for this will be on two of the following media forms – advertising, marketing, film, newspapers, radio, video games – and media contexts.

Students will study products from specific media industries and for specific audiences, set by the examination board, to develop their knowledge and understanding of those areas of the theoretical framework. They will also explore how media products relate to their social, cultural, historical, political and economic contexts.

Component 2: For this component, students are required to study three media forms in depth, exploring all areas of the theoretical framework – media language, representation, media industries, and audiences – in relation to audio-visual, print and online products set by WJEC. Students will study examples of • television • magazines • blogs and websites selected by the examination board.
Students will explore these three media forms through close analysis of the set products, comparing their use of media language and the representations they offer in relation to relevant social, cultural, economic, political and historical contexts. Students will study the role of media industries in shaping media products, as well as considering the way in which both mass and specialised audiences are targeted and addressed

Component 3: For this component, students are required to demonstrate their understanding of the framework in their own cross-media production. The production must be based on two media forms and completed in response to a choice of briefs set by WJEC. This must be accompanied with a written Statement and Aims that outlines their aims and intentions for their cross-media production. 500 words. This will be assessed with the cross-media production and will enable students to explain the ways in which they will apply knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework to the production and target the intended audience.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE Grade level 4 in English Language and Literature.

EXAM BOARD: WJEC EDUQAS

Music

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR MUSIC

Music students at Charters School will be creative in the way they make, listen to, explore, and appreciate music. They will be capable of critical, and analytical listening, which will in turn help them understand the processes of performance and composition. They will be inspired to discover new styles of music, both as listeners and performers. They will have opportunities to make music that play to their existing strengths and challenge them to develop new skills. They will explore the cultural significance of music and its influence on society today and gain an understanding of how the development of music through history sits within the wider cultural and political stories of societies.

This means:

  • They will be able to identify, analyse and evaluate a variety of musical elements from a range of different styles and be able to evaluate constructively the work of others
  • They will work creatively, adopting a range of musical techniques. They will perform confidently with the ability to assess and improve the accuracy and musicality of their own work
  • They will appreciate musical diversity and be able to apply their knowledge of musical elements to a range of historical and social context

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

A Level Music: A Level Music students study the OCR syllabus. The A Level requires students to develop their skills of performance, composition, listening, analysis and appraisal. Through the areas of study, students study a range of styles of music, and they have the opportunity to explore these through composition tasks. Students will be able to see and participate in a range of live performances, including that of their own compositions. The course enables them to develop an in-depth theoretical and historical understanding of Western Classical Music, which will be demonstrated in a written exam at the end of the course. This course is essential for those wishing to pursue music in Higher Education, but also provides a fantastic addition to an A Level portfolio as it enables students to develop a range of transferrable skills valued by universities and employers such as analysis, essay writing, evaluation, creativity, communication, historical awareness, and self-confidence.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP FOR MUSIC

COURSE DETAILS

A Level Music:
• Component 1 – Performing: This component requires students to plan, prepare and perform a solo recital on an instrument of their choice, lasting a minimum of 10 minutes.
• Component 2 – Composing: Learners are required to create two compositions with a combined duration of at least 4 minutes. One is written to a brief set by the examination board and the other is a free choice composition. Students are required to notate and organise a performance of their works.
• Component 3 – Listening and appraising: This component culminates in a written examination in which four Areas of Study will be tested:
o AoS1: Instrumental Music of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven
o AoS2: Popular Song: Blues, Jazz, Swing and Big Band
o AoS5: Programme Music 1820-1900
o AoS6: Innovations in Music 1900 to the present day
Students will study a range of set works and pieces chosen to exemplify the genres covered.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A Level Music: GCSE grade level 6 in Music and GCSE grade level 5 in English Languge or Literature.
A minimum of Grade 5 standard in one instrument or voice.

EXAM BOARD: OCR

Philosophy and Ethics

STATEMENT OF INTENT 

Religious Studies students at Charters School are interested and motivated by events, people and beliefs. As part of a local and wider community they are up to date with news and current affairs. They read and learn about issues as well as learning from them. Pupils engage in dialogue and debate and enjoy critical thinking. Pupils study a wide multi-faith curriculum debating current affairs with thought-provoking topics.

This means:

  • Students will appreciate the significance of holy places, beliefs, traditions and culture around the world.
  • They will be able to identify, analyse and evaluate different interpretations of the past and reach a balanced and reasoned judgement. Places of Worship, Religion & the Media.
  • They will be able to confidently articulate their understanding of the past both in academic writing as well as through debate and discussion. Sanctity of Life, Science & Ethics.
  • They will appreciate the ethnic and cultural diversity of our community and thereby become inclusive members of our society. Religion, Human Rights & Social Justice.
  • Through reading and writing, they will develop a critical and enquiring mind, which appreciates the impact of individual endeavour and shows empathy with the past. Global Issues, Interfaith Dialogue.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

A level Religious Studies Students follow the OCR syllabus. Students will take a historical approach to Philosophy and will consider different lines of argument from a variety of thinkers. Key thinkers from Plato, Aristotle, Mill and Kant are studied with contemporary contributions from Peter Singer and a variety of religious groups. The A level requires students study and develop the skills of knowledge and understanding with critical argument. Students are encourage to engage themselves fully in class discussion and involve themselves with current political and philosophical debate. Listening is an important skill in discussion and a variety of podcasts and discussions are considered along with the reading of classic texts to give students a varied approach to this interesting course.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS


Component 01: Philosophy of religion

Students study philosophical language and thought, and issues and questions raised by belief:

Ancient philosophical influences
The nature of the soul, mind and body
Arguments about the existence or non-existence of God
The nature and impact of religious experience
The challenge for religious belief of the problem of evil
Ideas about the nature of God
Issues in religious language.
 

Component 02: Religion and ethics

Students explore key concepts and the works of influential thinkers, ethical theories and their application:

Normative ethical theories
The application of ethical theory to two issues: business ethics and medical ethics
Ethical language and thought
Debates surrounding the significant idea of conscience
Sexual ethics and the influence on ethical thought of developments in religious beliefs.
 

Component 03: Developments in religious thought, Christianity

Students explore:

Religious beliefs, values and teachings, their interconnections and how they vary historically and in the contemporary world
Sources of religious wisdom and authority
Practices which shape and express religious identity, and how these vary within a tradition
Significant social and historical developments in theology and religious thought
Key themes related to the relationship between religion and society.
 

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS


GCSE grade level 6 in Religious Studies with GCSE grade level 5 in English Language or Literature.
The Head of Department may decide to accept students who have a grade level 6 in another Humanities subject

EXAM BOARD: OCR

 

Physical Education

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION

At Charters School, through Physical Education, students will be inspired to be active, healthy and deeply enthused by physical activity. Students will develop a love of learning in PE in an environment where they are supported to develop physically and intellectually, and can perform in a range of challenging situations. Students will be able challenge themselves as part of a team and individually.

In PE, students will develop their knowledge about the positive effects of exercise on their physical, social and mental health, and develop a passion and life-long commitment for exercise.

Students will also develop practical skills across a range of activities, as well as improving personal skills which will enable them to perform in a range of situations, including those that can involve working together in a competitive environment.

Students will experience a wide range of sporting activities that are underpinned by a broad, but increasingly complex, set of skills and abilities. It is our commitment to provide an environment that encourages a desire to participate in a range of activities or their chosen specialist sport / sports into adult life.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM FOR A LEVEL PE

A Level Physical Education is the study of human movement, performance and behaviour in relation to sport and P.E. It takes a multi-disciplinary approach encouraging the development of a range of methods. The course aims to provide greater knowledge, insight and understanding of human performances.

A-Level PE follows the OCR syllabus. The A-Level requires that over 2 years students study and are assessed in 4 different components; Physiological factors affecting performance, Psychological factors affecting performance, socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport and Performance in physical education.

The course requires students to:

  • develop theoretical knowledge and understanding of the factors that underpin physical activity and sport and use this knowledge to improve performance
  • understand how physiological and psychological states affect performance
  • understand the key socio-cultural factors that influence people’s involvement in physical
    activity and sport
  • understand the role of technology in physical activity and sport
  • refine their ability to perform effectively in physical activity and sport by developing skills
    and techniques and selecting and using tactics, strategies and/or compositional ideas
  • develop their ability to analyse and evaluate to improve performance
  • understand the contribution which physical activity makes to health and fitness
  • improve as effective and independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers with curious and enquiring minds.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP FOR PE

COURSE DETAILS

Component 1: Physiological Factors Affecting Performance (30% of total A-Level)

  • Anatomy & Physiology – The structure and function of the human body
  • Exercise Physiology – The study into what happens to your body during physical exercise
  • Biomechanics – Focus on the mechanics of movement. It involves the study of force and its effect on human movement in physical activities and sports

Component 2: Psychological Factors Affecting Performance (20% of total A-Level)

  • Skill Acquisition – Focus on what the coach/teacher does to help people learn new skills and keep current skills at a high level
  • Sport Psychology – Ways in which the coach/teacher can help a sportsperson’s mind-set before, during and after performance

Component 3: Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport (20% of total A-Level)

  • Sport & Society – learners will develop their knowledge and understanding of how physical activity and sport have developed through time and the factors that shape contemporary sport
  • Contemporary issues in physical activity and sport – learners will develop their knowledge and understanding in; Ethics & Deviance in sport, the positive and negative impacts of commercialisation & media in sport, the important and developing influences of modern technology in sport and finally the routes to sporting excellence in the UK

Component 4: Performance in Physical Education (30% of total A-Level)

  • Performance or coaching – learners are required to demonstrate effective performance, the use of tactics or techniques and the ability to observe the rules and conventions under applied conditions
  • Evaluation and Analysis of Performance for Improvement (EAPI) – learners will observe a live or recorded performance by a peer in their own assessed performance activity or another activity from the approved list. Through observation, learners will provide an oral response analysing and critically evaluating the performance.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR A LEVEL PE

GCSE grade level 6 in PE.

Or Distinction (Level 2) in either BTEC Sport, OCR Sport Science, OCR Sport Studies . GCSE grade level 5 in Science. GCSE grade level 5 in English Language or Literature.

The Head of Department may decide to accept students who have a grade level 5 in PE depending on their proximity to the grade boundary.

A BTEC (Level 2)/OCR/GCSE Qualification in a related subject would be advisable.

EXAM BOARD: OCR

 

 

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM FOR BTEC LEVEL 3 NATIONAL EXTENDED CERTIFICATE IN SPORT

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Sport follows the Edexcel (Pearson) syllabus. BTEC Sport requires that over 2 years’ students study and are assessed in 4 different units which are:

BTEC Sport

You will be assessed in three ways on the course

Assignment

Set and marked internally by your teachers (two units) and moderated by Pearson. Unit 3 and one of the optional units.

Synoptic Task

Set and marked by Pearson – completed in supervised conditions (60 marks). Unit 2.

Written Exam

Set and marked by Pearson (80 marks) 1.5 hours’ exam. Unit 1

The BTEC Sport course is designed for learners wishing to go on to further or higher level study of the sport sector or directly in to employment. The UCAS points gained from the course are widely recognised by universities and employers.

BTEC SPORT LEVEL 3 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

The course offers flexibility for students to progress to larger-size qualifications or specialise in a specific area. It provides opportunity for students to showcase their skills through practical assessments as well as underpinning knowledge and skills needed to meet requirements in the sporting industry. In addition, the course develops transferable skills such as communication, team working and leadership skills.

The course provides work-related learning, giving learners an edge and opening the door to higher education or employment in sport sectors. The BTEC Sport course offers clear progression routes: such as BSc in Sport, Physical Education and Coaching Science. Also supports progression into direct entry level roles such as physical activity leader or fitness/leisure assistant. Furthermore, it provides opportunities for a potential career in Personal Training, Sports Management and Sporting Events.

  • Equivalent in size to one A Level.
  • 4 units of which 3 are mandatory and 2 are external.
  • Mandatory content (83%).
  • External assessment (67%).

The Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Sport covers the key knowledge and practical skills required in the vocational Sport sector.

It consists of:

Three mandatory units:

Unit 1 – Anatomy & Physiology

  • Written examination set and marked by Pearson.
  • 1.5 hours.
  • 80 marks.
  • Learners explore how the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems function and the fundamentals of the energy systems.

Unit 2 –  Fitness Training and Programming for Health, Sport and Well-being

  • A task set and marked by Pearson and completed under supervised conditions.
  • In Part A, learners will be given a case study one week before a supervised assessment period in order to carry out preparation.
  • In Part B, the supervised assessment period is 2.5 hours as timetabled by Pearson.
  • Written submission.
  • 60 marks.
  • Learners explore client screening and lifestyle assessment, fitness training methods and fitness programming to support improvements in a client’s health and well-being.

Unit 3 –  Professional Development in the Sports Industry

  • Internally assessed
  • Coursework
  • Learners explore the knowledge and skills required for different career pathways in the sports industry. Learners will take part in, and reflect on, a personal skills audit, career action plan and practical interview assessment activities.

Learners will complete one of the three optional units, which are:

Unit 4 –  Sports Leadership

  • Internally assessed
  • Coursework
  • Learners study what makes a good leader, the different capacities of this role, and the leadership skills and techniques necessary when leading activities in different roles.

Unit 5 –  Application of Fitness Testing

  • Internally assessed
  • Coursework
  • Learners gain an understanding of the requirements of fitness testing and learn how to safely conduct a range of fitness tests for different components of fitness.

Unit 6 – Sports Psychology

  • Internally assessed
  • Coursework
  • This unit covers the psychological dimensions of sport, and introduces psychological techniques that can be used to enhance performance.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Must have GCSE English Level 5 or above.

GCSE grade level 5 in PE.

Or, Distinction in either:

Level 2 BTEC SPORT

OCR Sport Science

OCR Sport Studies

A BTEC ‘level 2’ / OCR / GCSE Qualification in a related subject would be advisable

EXAM BOARD: EDEXCEL (PEARSON)

 

Physics

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR PHYSICS

Physics students at Charters School will develop understanding and awareness of the Physics that surrounds them. They will learn to evaluate critically how science and technology changes society. With varied opportunities to learn through research, discovery and developing their practical skills, students will be engaged in and enjoy their learning. Students will develop teamwork skills, apply numeracy, and learn to effectively communicate their knowledge. These transferable skills will prepare them for their future in society and any career path they choose, alongside providing strong foundations for specialised Physics and Engineering Careers.

This means:

• They will hold their own point of view about developments in the world of Physics and articulate advantages and disadvantages, broadening their awareness through research, debate and discussion.

• They will learn how Physics has developed over time, building on the understanding and research of others, and the importance of scientists working as a community.

• Through scientific enquiry they will learn to ask scientific questions and use the laboratory resources and equipment to provide data to come to conclusions.

• They will make connections between the scientific principles and theory they learn and the applications in everyday life.

• They will make connections between technology and the world around us and how Physics has forwarded our understanding of the Universe.

• They will be aware of how scientific theory links to the varied occupations that use Physics, and specific Physics and Engineering careers.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

OCR’s A Level in Physics A specification aims to encourage learners to:

• develop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of the subject and how they relate to each other
• develop and demonstrate a deep appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of scientific methods
• develop competence and confidence in a variety of practical, mathematical and problem solving skills
• develop their interest in and enthusiasm for the subject, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with the subject
• understand how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society (as exemplified in ‘How Science Works’ (HSW)).

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

Content is split into six teaching modules

Module 1 – Development of practical skills in physics
Module 2 – Foundations of physics
Module 3 – Forces and motion
Module 4 – Electrons, waves and photons
Module 5 – Newtonian world and astrophysics
Module 6 – Particles and medical physics

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GSCE Triple Science

GCSE grade level 6 in the subject and a GCSE grade Level 6 in Mathematics and a GCSE grade level 5 in English Language or Literature.

GSCE Double Science

Of the two grades allocated for your GCSE one must be at least GCSE grade level 7 and the other at least a GCSE grade level 6. You must also achieve a GCSE grade level 6 in Mathematics and a GCSE grade level 5 in English Language or Literature.

It is also recommended that you study A level Mathematics.

EXAM BOARD: OCR

 

Psychology

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology students at Charters School will be inquisitive and motivated to learn more about the key issues and debates within the study of human behaviour. They will develop a greater sense of ethical issues surrounding the study of human behaviour and in turn develop a greater sense of tolerance and understanding. They will explore how understanding psychology has real world applications and how it is crucial to our everyday life. They will learn to challenge and question the power of social influence, conformity and enhance their understanding of mental health related illnesses making them feel more confident, autonomous and equipped for their future lives.

This means:

  • They will have a strong understanding of the key issues and debates within Psychology, such as nature/nurture.
  • They will explore and examine the impact and influence of Psychology in understanding human behaviour.
  • They will be able to identify, critically analyse and evaluate different Psychological approaches within Psychology and understand the benefits of Interactionism.
  • They will be able to confidently articulate how Psychological research has influenced our everyday practice both in their academic writing as well as through Socratic dialogue.
  • They will examine and critically evaluate the array on investigation techniques when carrying out the Psychological research.
  • They will develop a critical and enquiring mind, which appreciates the youth of Psychology as an academic discipline but also the potential it carries.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

A level Psychology is a very popular choice with sixth form students and follows the AQA syllabus. The A level requires that, over the two years, students study Topics in Psychology, Psychology in context and Issues and options in Psychology. Students learn about the different and contrasting approaches in which Psychology can be explored. The course places strong emphasis in developing students’ ability to learn in-depth the theoretical, practical, ethical and analytical understanding of how Psychology can be studied and investigated. Students will address the key issues and debates within Psychology while enhancing their knowledge, application, mathematical, analytical and evaluative skills. The course not only compliments a wide variety of other A levels choices offered at Charters it also provides a solid foundation for anyone seeking to study Psychology at university or enter the labour market. Psychology encourages curiosity, provides a platform to discuss diversity, equality and progression while also offering transferable skills such as self-confidence and awareness, effective verbal and written communication, evaluation, team work and mathematical analysis.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

Paper 1: Introductory topics in Psychology: Social Influence, Attachments, Memory, Psychopathology

Paper 2: Psychology in context: Approaches, Biopsychology, Research Methods

Paper 3: Issues and options in Psychology: Issues and Debates, Relationships, Eating Behaviour, Forensic Psychology

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade 4 Maths, grade 4 Science and GCSE Grade 5 in English Language or English Literature.

EXAM BOARD: AQA

Sociology

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR SOCIOLOGY

Sociology students at Charters School will be curious and motivated to learn more about key sociological issues within British society. They will develop a greater understanding and awareness of social, political, legal and educational changes in society and their implications. They will develop a greater sense of tolerance and understanding of class, gender and ethnic diversity and differences in society and of the role and purpose of key institutions.

This means:

  • They will have a strong understanding of the key institutions.
  • They will explore and examine the impact and influence of key institutions in understanding society.
  • They will be able to identify, critically analyse and evaluate different sociological approaches within Sociology.
  •  They will examine and critically evaluate an array of investigative techniques when carrying out sociological research.
  • They will be encouraged to think independently, open their minds, question social structures and be aware of contemporary social issues.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

A level Sociology is a popular choice with sixth form students and follows the AQA syllabus. The A level requires that, over the two years, students study Education with Theory and Methods, Topics in Sociology and Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods. Students learn about socialisation, culture and identity whilst exploring social differentiation, power and stratification, with a central focus on contemporary UK society and changes within a globalised context. Students will also examine the significance of conflict and consensus theories within the study of Sociology and learn about social structures and key institutions in society, social action and the role of values. Students will develop an in-depth theoretical, practical and analytical understanding of how society can be studied and investigated thorough research methods. The course not only compliments a wide variety of other A levels choices offered at Charters it also provides a solid foundation for anyone seeking to study Sociology at university or enter the labour market. Sociology encourages tolerance and explores diversity, learning about choice and the fluid nature of changes within society. Sociology also develops transferable skills such as self-confidence, effective verbal and written communication, critical analysis, evaluation and an awareness of social, political and economic changes in society and their global impact.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

100% EXAMINATION

Paper 1: Education with Theory and Methods (2 hours – 33%)

Paper 2: Topics in Sociology: Beliefs in Society and Families and Households (2 hours – 33%)

Paper 3: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods (2 hours – 33%)

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE Grade 5 in English Language or Literature.

Students who have exceptional circumstances, and who do not meet these criteria, may be considered for the course however the decision lies with the Subject Leader.

EXAM BOARD: AQA

Spanish

STATEMENT OF INTENT FOR SPANISH

Language students at Charters School will be equipped with the skills necessary to interact in everyday situations in French and Spanish-speaking countries. They will be confident communicators, capable of articulating ideas, desires and needs in various contexts. They will appreciate the value of language-learning and understand more about the cultures of the languages studied. This understanding will help them develop a greater sense of their own identity and appreciate the values and diversity of local and global communities. Through language-learning, they will develop a range of soft skills, including independence, resilience, research and teamwork.

This means:

  • They will recognise that language-learning is a cumulative process which takes consistent effort and intellectual stamina
  • They will experience foreign cultures through exposure to the arts, entertainment, food and current affairs
  • They will have the opportunity to visit France and Spain with Charters
  • They will learn and use vocabulary and grammar effectively and independently, to communicate successfully
  • They will participate fully in pair and group work to support and learn from others.

SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM

A level Spanish is a vibrant course that combines well with many other subjects, leading to a wide range of opportunities at university and in the world of work.

Students learn to communicate at a high level in Spanish, through the study of topical issues and cultural matters.

Authentic materials are drawn from many sources, including the Spanish media.

A significant amount of grammar is taught in the first term to bridge the gap between GCSE and A level.

Students take responsibility for their own learning and developing skills to a high level.

Speaking skills are developed through one-to-one/two sessions with the Spanish FLA.

Students also have the opportunity for a week’s work experience in Spain during the Y12 work experience week.

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM MAP

COURSE DETAILS

Paper 1: Listening, reading and translation
Paper 1 is based on four themes: the evolution of Spanish society; political and artistic culture of the Spanish-speaking world; immigration and multicultural society in Spain; the Franco dictatorship and the transition to democracy.

Paper 2: written response to works and translation
Students study a literary text (Como Agua Para Chocolate) and a film (Volver).

Paper 3: Speaking
Paper 3 is based on four themes: the evolution of Spanish society; political and artistic culture of the Spanish-speaking world; immigration and multicultural society in Spain; the Franco dictatorship and the transition to democracy. There is also an independent research project.

KEY STAGE 5 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

GCSE grade level 6 in Spanish and GCSE grade level 4 in English Language or Literature. A grammar assessment takes place in September of Y12.

EXAM BOARD: EDEXCEL