FPQ, HPQ and EPQ

FPQ

FPQ stands for Foundation Projects Qualification.

This qualification has been designed to stretch and challenge Year 8 students and requires them to carry out independant research on a topic. They then use this research to produce a written report and, in the case of practical projects, an artefact or a production. Benefits of undertaking this qualification include extending and developing learning around a specific subject, developing skills in independent research and project management and introducing students to project qualifications in preparation for taking the HPQ and EPQ. 

To gain the qualification, students produce:

  • A production log – A diary that logs the progress they have made throughout the year.
  • Research – A collection of sources and a bibliography that relate to their topic.
  • A 1000 word essay – answering their hypothesis for their chosen question.
  • A presentation – which summarises their project and reflects on the projects outcomes.

A student can take inspiration from something studied in class or something completely unrelated to their studies and projects are overseen by project supervisors who guide students through the process.

FPQ titles from our students have included:

Are people with dissociative identity disorder aware of the existence of their other alters? 

Is artificial intelligence changing humans for better or worse?

Has social media had a positive or negative impact on social skills within teens in the past few decades? 

Is Amazon having an positive or negative impact on climate change?

HPQ

HPQ stand for Higher Project Qualification.

This qualification has been designed to stretch and challenge Year 10 students, especially those aspiring for University, by developing important academic skills required at higher education. Students develop essential skills such as: referencing; essay writing; creating a bibliography; creating a presentation, researching and deploying secondary and primary sources.

Students are expected to plan, research and develop the argument of their chosen question themselves.

To gain the qualification, students produce:

  • A production log – A diary that logs the progress they have made throughout the year.
  • Research – A collection of sources and a bibliography that relate to their topic.
  • A 2000 word essay – answering their hypothesis for their chosen question.
  • A presentation – which summarises their project and reflects on the projects outcomes.
HPQ titles from our students have included:

Should satire be used to teach history?

What can society do to protect itself from online hacking?

Is a Mars colony viable in the next 20 years?

How will quantum development affect cybersecurity?

How beneficial would a global language be?

To what extent should the United States' loff of the Vietnam War be blamed on the military?

EPQ

EPQ stands for Extended Project Qualification.

This level 3 qualification is an independent research task undertaken during Year 12 and involves either writing an extended essay of about 5,000 words or creating a product with an accompanying shorter essay of about 1,000 words. This product could be anything from a drone to an app to a music composition. Both options require students to present to their peers and assessors for about 10–15 minutes at the end of their EPQ journey about their final product and the production journey.

Students are also expected to reflect and evaluate the process as they go along, completing a logbook, which comprises part of their assessment.

An EPQ is the longest and most extensive project that students can undertake during their time at Sixth Form and is well regarded by universities. Taught sessions are run during the Sixth Form Enrichment programme.

EPQ titles from our students have included:

Under what circumstances should umbilical cord blood be collected and stored?

Do Marine Protected Areas increase resilience of coral reefs to ocean acidification?

Is prioritising our iconic species the most effective strategy for biodiversity?

Should we allow artificial intelligence in self-driving vehicles to make emergency decisions concerning human life?

To what extent can Joan of Arc be viewed simultaneously as a spiritual, political and secular hero for France?

To what extent is there institutionalized racism in the UK film industry and can it be combatted?